RETURN
TO
INDEX
RETURN
TO
INDEX

ABSTRACT

J Clin Microbiol 2000 September; 38 (9): 3240-3248

Link to Article Source New window link indicator

Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: IS900 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and IS1311 Polymorphism Analyses of Isolates from Animals and a Human in Australia

R. J. Whittington,1 A. F. Hope,2 D. J. Marshall,3 C. A. Taragel,3 and I. Marsh1
NSW Agriculture, Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, Camden, New South Wales 2570,1 Victorian Institute of Animal Science, West Meadows, Victoria 3047,2 and NSW Agriculture, Orange Agricultural Institute, Orange, New South Wales 2580,3 Australia

Received January 5, 2000; Revisions requested April 8, 2000; Accepted June 22, 2000

The distribution and prevalence of strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis were determined among sheep, cattle, and other species with Johne's disease in Australia. A total of 328 isolates were evaluated from numerous farms in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia, Australia. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of genomic DNA using BstEII and an IS900 probe and IS1311 polymorphism analysis using PCR and restriction endonuclease analysis (PCR-REA) was used to classify isolates as cattle (C) or sheep (S) strains. IS1311 PCR-REA provided similar information to IS900 RFLP analysis but was more useful than RFLP analysis where DNA was degraded or scarce. Twelve IS900 RFLP types were found. Johne's disease in sheep was always due to S strains, while cattle were infected only with C strains. RFLP type S1 was the dominant strain in sheep in New South Wales (97% of isolates) and was the only strain found in sheep from Victoria. Seven RFLP types were present in cattle. RFLP types C3 and C1 were most common (collectively, 85% of isolates), but C1 was not found in New South Wales and C3 was present in dairy cattle but not in beef cattle in Victoria. These differences may be explained by restricted livestock trading patterns between different segments of the cattle industry. Up to five RFLP types were present in some geographic regions in Victoria, while up to three RFLP types were found among cattle on some farms. Individual cattle usually were infected with only one RFLP type, but one animal was infected with both C5 and CU4. Two isolates from goats were C type as were three from alpacas, one from a rhinoceros, and two from a human with Crohn's disease. The prevalences of specific RFLP types in Australia differ from those reported in Europe and elsewhere. Given the existence of geographical and farm enterprise differences in IS900 RFLP type, this technique may be applied selectively to trace the spread of Johne's disease, at least in the cattle industries. As these observations reflect past exposure of livestock to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the monitoring of strains present in animals in Australia is continuing.


Source: http://www.crohns.org/articles/2000_09_3240-8_jcm.htm   Contact PARA: http://www.crohns.org/contact.htm
Paratuberculosis Awareness & Research Association